RVs and Lemon Laws Per State (Explained for Beginners)

If you have purchased an RV that has provided nothing but endless hassles and multiple attempts to repair your RV, have failed.

You try to get it fixed, but your manufacturer does not honor the warranty anymore because of how old and beat up your RV is.

This is called having a “lemon.”

What are the lemon laws per state for RVs?

There is a common federal RV lemon law called the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act that protects RV buyers when an RV manufacturer fails to honor the written warranty they have in place. This law exists across all U.S. states, but the factors may differ from one state to another.

Whilst most states will have an RV lemon law, some states do not have lemon laws that protect certain RVs at all.

When is My RV Considered a Lemon?

You do not want a lemon for an RV, especially if you are a new RV enthusiast that is still getting around the ropes of owning an RV.

Your RV is classified as a lemon if it ticks any of the below:



  • The RV is still under warranty, but the problem continues after two failed attempts to fix the manufacturer repair shop issue.
  • Your RV has been deemed unsafe to drive/ travel in.
  • The attempts to fix the persistent problem have led to further damage to the RV or caused a depreciation in its value.
  • You have been without your RV for longer than 30 days because it is being repaired.
  • The problems came about within 18 months or 18,000 miles of purchasing your RV.

What Exactly are Lemon Laws?

Lemon laws have been put into place by the states of the U.S that offer a solution for purchasers of vehicles and other consumer goods and provide compensation for vehicles and products that are repeatedly failing to meet performance functionality and quality standards.

Lemon laws for each state will offer a solution of protection for those buyers of RVs who have purchased a “lemon” RV that is defective and continually failing repair attempts. 

State and federal lemon laws can help an RV buyer find a remedy not to lose their money or investment.

Even if the lemon law in your specific state excludes or partially excludes lemon RVs, the consumer can file a legal claim under the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act.

Texas Lemon Laws for RVs

Texas extends lemon law coverage to RV owners, and if you have bought, registered, and titled your RV trailer in Texas, then it is also covered.

Below is the criteria for Texas lemon laws to be enforced:

  • The problem must be resolved before it reaches 24,000 miles or before it is two years old.
  • You have tried to repair the RV four times unsuccessfully.
  • You have not been able to drive your RV for more than 30 days because it is being repaired.
  • Safety test failure, i.e., the RV, could explode or catch fire if it is not repaired.

Table of State Lemon Laws

If you need to know if your RV will qualify under your residential state’s lemon laws, then below is a table detailing what is considered a lemon RV and when the given state covers it for protection:

STATE WHAT IS A LEMON IN MY STATE?
Alabama / Colorado / Connecticut / District of Columbia / Indiana / Iowa / Kentucky / Maryland / Massachusetts / Michigan / Nevada / North Dakota / Oregon / Pennsylvania / Rhode Island / South Dakota / Tennessee
  • You’ve made several attempts to repair your vehicle within a reasonable amount of time to complete them within the warranty, but they were unsuccessful.
Alaska
  • You’ve made at least 3 unsuccessful repair attempts, and the vehicle has been at least 30 business days out of service.
Arizona
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • 30 calendar days within less than 2 years or 24,000 miles.
  • Applies only to the chassis of RVs under 10,000 lb.
Arkansas
  • You’ve made at least 3 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • 1 Unsuccessful repair of a problem could result in death or serious bodily injury within longer than 2 years or 24,000 miles.
  • Applies only to the chassis of RVs.
California
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts, and the vehicle has been at least 30 business days out of service.
  • You have made 2 unsuccessful repair attempts on a safety defect within less than 18 months or 18,000 miles.
  • You’ve made several attempts to repair your vehicle within a reasonable amount of time to complete them within the warranty, but they were unsuccessful.
  • Applies only to the chassis of RVs under 10,000 lb.
Delaware / Louisiana / Missouri / Utah / Wisconsin
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts, and the vehicle has been at least 30 business days out of service within less than one year or the warranty.
  • Applies only to the chassis of RVs.
Florida
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts, and the vehicle has been at least 60 business days out of service within two years of delivery.
  • Only non-living areas of the RV are covered.
Georgia
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts, and the vehicle has been at least 30 business days out of service within less than 24,000 miles or 2 years.
  • 1 repair or 15 days out of service within less than 1 month or 12,000 miles.
  • 1 unsuccessful repair of a serious safety defect in braking or steering system within less than 12 months or 12,000 miles.
  • Applies only to the chassis of RVs under 10,000 lb.
Hawaii
  • You’ve made at least 3 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • You have made 1 unsuccessful repair attempt on a safety defect that could cause bodily harm.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 business days out of service within less than 24 months or 24,000 miles.
  • This only applies to RVs under 10,000 lb.
Idaho
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 business days out of service within less than 24 months or 24,000 miles.
  • You have made 1 repair of a complete failure of the braking or steering system that may result in death or serious bodily harm.
Illinois
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 business days out of service within less than 12 months or 12,000 miles.
Kansas
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 calendar days out of service.
  • You have made 10 total repairs within less than 12 months or the warranty period.
  • This is only for chassis under 12,000 lb.
Maine
  • You’ve made at least 3 Unsuccessful repair attempts (The same repair shop made at least 2 attempts)
  • Your vehicle has been 15 business days out of service within less than warranty or 24 months or 18,000 miles.
Minnesota
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • At least 1 unsuccessful repair was of total braking or steering loss that may result in death or serious bodily harm within less than 2 years of the warranty.
  • This is only for chassis.
Mississippi
  • You’ve made at least 3 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 15 business days out of service within less than 1 year or warranty.
  • This is only for chassis.
Montana / New York
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 business days out of service after notice within less than 2 years or 18,000 miles.
  • Covers the chassis only.
Nebraska
  • You’ve made at least 4 unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 40 calendar days out of service within less than 12 months of warranty.
New Hampshire
  • You’ve made at least 3 Unsuccessful repair attempts by the same dealer or repairer.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 business days out of service within warranty.
  • It only applies to RVs under 9,000 lb.
New Jersey
  • You’ve made at least 3 Unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 20 calendar days out of service within less than 24 months or 18,000 miles.
  • It only applies to chassis.
New Mexico
  • You’ve made at least 4 Unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 business days out of service within less than 1 year or warranty.
  • It only applies to RVs under 10,000 lb.
North Carolina
  • You’ve made at least 4 Unsuccessful repair attempts within less than 24 months, 24,000 miles, or warranty.
  • Your vehicle has been 20 business days out of service during any 12-month period of the warranty.
  • It only applies to RVs under 10,000 lb.
Ohio
  • You’ve made at least 3 Unsuccessful repair attempts of the same defect.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 calendar days out of service.
  • There have been 8 total repairs of any defects.
  • At least one repair was 1 unsuccessful repair of the problem that may result in death or serious bodily harm within 1 year or 18,000 miles.
  • Except for facilities related to sleeping and eating.
Oklahoma
  • You’ve made at least 4 Unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 45 calendar days out of service within less than 1 year or warranty.
  • Applies only to the chassis of RVs under 10,000 lb.
South Carolina
  • You’ve made at least 3 Unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 calendar days out of service within less than 1 year or 12,000 miles.
  • Applies only to the chassis.
Vermont
  • You’ve made at least 3 Unsuccessful repair attempts when at least the first repair was within warranty.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 calendar days out of service within warranty.
  • Applies only to the chassis.
Virginia
  • You’ve made at least 3 Unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • 1 repair attempt at a serious safety defect.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 calendar days out of service within 18 months.
  • Applies only to the chassis.
Washington
  • You’ve made at least 4 Unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 calendar days out of service (15 during the warranty period).
  • There have been at least 2 repairs of serious safety defects, first reported within the warranty term or 24 months or 24,000 miles.
  • At least one repair was 1 repair attempt, and 15 of the 30 days must fall within greater of manufacturer’s warranty term or at least 1 year of 12,000 miles.
  • Applies only to the chassis.
West Virginia
  • You’ve made at least 3 Unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 calendar days out of service.
  • At least one repair was 1 unsuccessful repair of the problem that may result in death or serious bodily harm within 1 year or warranty.
  • Applies only to the chassis.
Wyoming
  • You’ve made at least 3 Unsuccessful repair attempts.
  • Your vehicle has been 30 business days out of service within 1 year.
  • This applies only to RVs under 10,000 lb.

What Types of RV Problems are Covered by Lemon Laws?

Some states have better RV lemon laws than others.

Most states will only cover an RV’s chassis and engine, whilst other states may completely exclude towable RVs from their lemon law protection.

Certain lemon laws will only cover defects in the RV chassis, while other lemon laws limit coverage to the “non-living” areas within the RV only.

Once again, it all depends on your state whether the chassis, propulsion system, and chassis cab are covered, and you may find that other portions of the RV are completely excluded.

I Think My RV is a Lemon, Now What?

If you think you have purchased a lemon RV, then ensure you consider the following factors and make sure you respond to each correctly:

  • Keep all your documentation together and in order: This includes repair correspondence, emails, receipts, warranty paperwork, etc.
  • Do not procrastinate: Once a problem persists, contact your dealer immediately and start the documentation process.
  • Know your rights and the laws in your state: If you live permanently in your RV, then make sure you have established legal residence in one state. Establishing your state of domicile can affect the outcome of the claim.
  • Understand federal-level protections.
  • Consider possible legal representation if the issue cannot be resolved.

Sources:

FIND YOUR STATE RV LEMON LAW

What is Lemon Law?

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